Alcoholics Anonymous

The Pat Moore Foundation offers its residents access to on-site and off-site meetings of Alcoholics Anonymous and 12-Step Programs. Following is additional information on these programs, courtesy of Alcoholics Anonymous. For more detailed information please contact Alcoholics Anonymous directly.

Defining Alcoholics Anonymous

Alcoholics Anonymous is a fellowship of men and women who share their experience, strength and hope with each other that they may solve their common problem and help others to recover from alcoholism. The only requirement for membership is a desire to stop drinking. There are no dues or fees for A.A. membership; we are selfsupporting through our own contributions. A.A. is not allied with any sect, denomination, politics, organization or institution; does not wish to engage in any controversy; neither endorses nor opposes any causes. Our primary purpose is to stay sober and help other alcoholics to achieve sobriety.

Alcoholics Anonymous can also be defined as an informal society of more than 2,000,000 recovered alcoholics in the United States, Canada, and other countries. These men and women meet in local groups, which range in size from a handful in some localities to many hundreds in larger communities. Currently, women make up 35 percent of the total membership.

Membership

Because A.A. has never attempted to keep formal membership lists, it is extremely difficult to obtain completely accurate figures on total membership at any given time. Some local groups are not listed with the General Service Office. Others do not provide membership data, thus are not recorded on the G.S.O. computer records. The membership figures listed below are based on reports to the General Service Office as of January 1, 2005, plus an average allowance for groups that have not reported their membership. There is no practical way of counting members who are not affiliated with a local group.

Estimated A.A. Membership and Group Information

Groups in U.S.
Members in U.S.
Groups in Canada
Members in Canada
Groups Outside of U.S./Canada
Members Outside of U.S./Canada
Internationalists
Groups in Correctional Facilities U.S./Canada
Members in Correctional Facilities U.S./Canada
Lone Members
Total Reported
Members
Groups

 

A.A. Articles

The Structure of A.A.
Alcoholics Anonymous is not organized in the formal or political sense. There are no governing officers, no rules or regulations, no fees or dues. Click here to continue.

A.A. Traditions
During its first decade, A. A. as a fellowship accumulated substantial experience which indicated that certain group attitudes and principles were particularly valuable in assuring ... Click here to continue.

A.A. and Alcoholism
A.A. is concerned solely with the personal recovery and continued sobriety of individual alcoholics who turn to the Fellowship for help... Click here to continue.

A.A. The Importance of Anonymity
Traditionally, A.A. members have always taken care to preserve their anonymity at the “public” level: press, radio, television, and films, and new media technologies, such as the Internet... Click here to continue.

A.A. Public Relations
The 1956 General Service Conference of A.A. adopted unanimously the following statement of “A.A.’s Public Information Policy”... Click here to continue.

A.A. The Recovery Program
The relative success of the A.A. program seems to be due to the fact that an alcoholic who no longer drinks has an exceptional faculty ... Click here to continue.

A.A. Meetings
The two most common kinds of A.A. meetings are: OPEN MEETINGS: As the term suggests, meetings of this type are open to alcoholics ... Click here to continue.

A.A. Literature, Page One
A substantial body of literature describing and interpreting the A.A. program has developed. This material may be classified under three headings... Click here to continue.

A.A. Literature, Page Two
A substantial body of literature describing and interpreting the A.A. program has developed. This material may be classified under three headings... Click here to continue.

A.A. Financial Policy
Over the years, Alcoholics Anonymous has affirmed and strengthened a tradition of being fully self-supporting and of not seeking, or accepting, contributions from... Click here to continue.

A.A. Historical Data, Page One
A.A. had its beginnings in 1935 at Akron, Ohio, as the outcome of a meeting between Bill W., a New York stockbroker, and Dr. Bob S.... Click here to continue.

A.A. Historical Data, Page Two
A.A. had its beginnings in 1935 at Akron, Ohio, as the outcome of a meeting between Bill W., a New York stockbroker, and Dr. Bob S.... Click here to continue.

A.A. Historical Data, Page Three
The following year witnessed still another significant event. The New York office had greatly expanded its activities.... Click here to continue.

The above information is from "A.A. Fact File", prepared by General Service Office of Alcoholics Anonymous. This information is also available on G.S.O.'s A.A. Website: www.aa.org.

If you have any questions about Alcoholics Anonymous or alcohol treatment, please call us 24-hours at (888) 426-6086 or if you'd like us to contact you, send us a confidential e-mail by filling out our online form.